Top 5 Injuries likely to Happen When Playing Rugby

Written by sports-admin
Saturday, 19 November 2016 1:25 PM

With the Autumn tests well on their way, I thought we’d take a look at the current top 5 rugby injuries happening today. Another important document worth a look is the current IRB concussion guidelines link is at bottom of this blog

In 5th place…..Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury.

What is it? – The MCL is a ligament found in our knee, which works with other ligaments to give us stability during running and walking. Injury is caused by the fibres that make up the ligament being torn or completely ruptured.

Why does it occur? – MCL injuries are more likely to occur in players who play in a back position, due to the increased likelihood of being tackled and the requirement for fast changes of directions. The force of a tackle can place excessive strain on the ligament causing the tear.

What can be done to prevent it?- Conditioning training can be undertaken to improve the strength of the knee and speed work, which improves the resilience of the knee to the stresses and strains of sudden changes of direction.

 In 4th place…..Calf Muscle Injury

What is it? – A calf strain is a tear to either the Gastrocnemius or Soleus muscle, most commonly at the point where they join the Achilles tendon.

Why does it occur?- Multiple factors such as, not warming up effectively, insufficient recovery time between matches, weak or tight calf muscles, poor running, speed work on very tired muscles, overstretching or incorrect stretching, structural problems e.g. over-pronation (rolling inwards) or over- supination (rolling outwards) of the foot.

What can be done to prevent it?- Implementation of effective recovery techniques (e.g. ice baths), conditioning training and corrective rehabilitation to improve running technique can prevent injury.

In 3rd place……Thigh haematoma

What is it? Haematoma is caused by a direct blow to the affected area. They are basically a severe bruise as the trauma causes damage to the blood vessels leading to blood leaking around the tissue forming a large clot.

Why does it occur? From physical contact and impact. As rugby is a contact sport these injuries are bound to happen.

What can be done to prevent it? Not much! It is very difficult to prevent without changing what makes rugby such a great game. Early implementation of RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) principles can dramatically reduce recovery time and should be implemented as soon as possible post-injury.

In 2nd place……..Hamstring Injury

What is it? It is a tear of the muscle fibres that make up the hamstring (bicep femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus).

Why does it occur? Multiple factors such as, not warming up effectively, insufficient recovery time between matches, weak or tight hamstring muscles, poor running, speed work on very tired muscles, overstretching or incorrect stretching and structural problems.

What can be done to prevent it? Implementation of effective recovery techniques (e.g. ice baths), conditioning training and corrective rehabilitation to improve running technique can help prevent injury.Cryotherapy treatment – where available!

In 1st place….Concussion

What is it? Concussions are traumatic head injuries that occur from both mild and severe blows to the head.

Why does it occur? It is simply caused by the contact nature of rugby. And can be via direct impact to the head or indirectly such as a tack that forcefully cause a whiplash-type effect to the player involved.

With concussion, we have to remember that one 10% of concussions result in loss of consciousness and all the medical team and coaches should be aware of the guidelines.

Why can be done to prevent it? Not much! It is very difficult to prevent without changes what makes rugby such a great game. The RFU work hard to ensure they have a robust process in place to manage suspected head injuries effectively.

IRB Concussion Guidelines can be found here

Please get in touch EMAIL David Jenkins Here if you are concerned or have any injury not just those received through playing rugby.

Have any questions or would like to know more, contact us

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